Race Review: Run Melbourne

Event: Run Melbourne
Date: 24th July 2022
Type: Road
Distance: 21.1km/ 10km/ 5km
Where: Melbourne, Victoria
Event Partners/Sponsors: Gatorade, Sole Motive, Asics, Runners World, Fisiocrem, City of Melbourne


Ten years ago, I ran my very first half marathon at Run Melbourne.

It seemed fitting ten years on, to go back to where it all started.

Melbourne was my home for 16 years, and it’s always going to have a place in my heart.

My first Run Melbourne was back in 2012. You can read the race review here – Run Melbourne 2012.

I went back again in 2013 and ran a personal best: 1:49:23. That pb would stand until 2018 at the Australian Running Festival, in Canberra, where I ran a time of 1:43:26.

This time around, I wasn’t going for a personal best or even to race.

Run Melbourne this time around would be about embracing the city that was my teen and young adult life.

Back when I did the event in 2012 & 2013, it was a two-lap course. I’m not sure when they changed the course but I was happy about the changes.

The half marathon started at 6:45 am, so it was easier for me to drive than deal with public transport.

Waking up earlier isn’t an issue for me, as I’m up at 5 am most days for work, so race day was no exception.

Laying out my gear the night before, and packing my bag I had everything I needed.

Breakfast was crumpets, but my mum’s toaster has lost all the numbers on it. So you don’t know the level of toastyness. It will be undercooked or burnt, there is no in-between.

Sadly my crumpets were undercooked. They were so gross, that I ended up leaving them on the letterbox (don’t worry they went into the compost), and thus I didn’t have a sufficient breakfast. While this didn’t cause any issues during the race, it did affect my recovery.

The drive from Werribee to the city was trouble-free. Parking was a breeze as I parked at the National Gallery of Victoria and then walked over to the event arena at Melbourne park.

I arrived at Melbourne park with ample time to check in my bag and then go find a loo.

What’s a race without the mandatory nervous wee?

The queue for the women’s toilets was outrageous! However, I was committed, and it actually moved relatively quickly.

Because my breakfast was a disaster, I decided to eat my fruit pouch, to at least give me some energy.

Standing in line, you make idle chit-chat with other runners. Surprisingly a few of the ladies around me were also using Run Melbourne as a training run for Melbourne Marathon. I hope their training is trouble-free, and their events are stellar.

After the nervous wee was complete it was a power walk to the start line, approximately 500 meters away.

I was in wave B and made my way to the wave B holding bay.

There was a kerfuffle about how the waves were released. The wheelchair athletes go first, then the elites in wave A, then B, etc.

We heard the starting gun go off for the wheelchairs, and then again for wave A. We all heard the master of ceremonies announce the next wave to come forth. Half of the wave moved on, but one of the officials or volunteers refused us to move forward. It was quite strange.

Eventually, we made it to the start line.

Dumping my jumper (that I bought at the op-shop the day prior), I was ready.

Don’t worry, all the clothing left behind would be collected and then distributed to those in need.

We chanted the count down, and then we were off.

It’s so easy to go out like a bull out of a gate. It takes skill to hold back, but that’s what I did.

Traveling down Flinders street, we went past the iconic Flinders street station, heading towards Docklands and taking in the sites.

The most random thing I saw was Cow Up a Tree, in Docklands. I wish I took a photo of it. Next time.

The state had a massive thunderstorm the night prior. So the streets were wet, and it was hard to avoid puddles. Just after the Cow Up a Tree Sculpture, there was a puddle that I was unable to avoid unless, of course, I wanted to crash into another runner. I decided to just embrace it, and get wet feet.

Wet feet don’t bother me. Maybe it’s all that trail running, you get used to things like that.

Weaving our way around the city, we ran along the Yarra River, before making out way towards the Shrine of Remembrance.

Yarra River, Southbank

We were halfway through the race. Popping in my earphones I decided to listen to some music.

I stopped at a few of the aid stations to take in some water, but generally I was happy with my pacing.

Fawkner Park would have to be one of the highlights of the course. Having never been there before, it was lovely to run along the path with these beautiful Moreton Bay Figs, Elms, Poplars, and Oaks, many of which were planted in the 19th century!

Again, because of the rain, there were many puddles. While everyone else decided to vear to the left or right to avoid them, I decided to plow right on through, since I had the width of the path to myself.

At kilometer 18, is the infamous “Anderson” Street hill. Many were walking up it, I just powered on.

Morell Bridge

Crossing the Morell Bridge I knew I was on the home stretch. The sun was out it was just a magnificent day.

Picking up the pace, I was determined to finish with a smile on my face.

The last few k’s are along the capital city trail along the Yarra River. The Tanderrum Bridge in that last kilometer felt brutal on tired legs. Honestly, it felt like my legs were going through cement.

Tanderrum Bridge (downhill)

Crossing the line at a respectable time of 1:56:26, I was elated.

The weather turned on for Run Melbourne and it just added to the experience.

I thoroughly enjoyed my race, and it’s making me look forward to coming back in October to experience more Melbourne magic for the Melbourne Marathon.

Top: Operation Move
Bottoms: Boody Motivate Shorts
Socks: Steigen
Shoes: Skechers GoRun7
Fuel: Water, Cliff gel/chews, Golden Circle fruit pouch

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